Chemical Philosophy: Kant, Schelling, and DeLanda

  • Ben Woodard
Keywords: Chemistry, Kant, Schelling, DeLanda, philosophy of science

Abstract

The following essay examines the role of chemistry as an arbiter between sense and cognition in the work of Immanuel Kant and F. W. J. von Schelling. Kant’s well-known and decidedly lukewarm treatment of chemistry not only affects the relation between philosophy and science more broadly, but has important consequences for how to think of the relationship between the formal structures we can derive from sense as articulated by philosophy and how these conceptual forms give sense (scientifically coded as observation) a regulative function to discriminate particular scientific domains and/or fields from one another.

Author Biography

Ben Woodard

Researcher
IPK Leuphana University,
Universitätsallee 1, 21335 Lüneburg
E-mail: woodardbenjamin@gmail.com

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Published
2020-07-25
How to Cite
WoodardB. (2020). Chemical Philosophy: Kant, Schelling, and DeLanda. Stasis, 9(1). Retrieved from http://stasisjournal.net/index.php/journal/article/view/167